10 Common IRS Audit Flags

in Financial Planning by

You may have recently read that the IRS is conducting fewer audits due to budget cuts. But, keep in mind that the IRS still audited more than 1.2 million returns last year! To prevent fraud, the IRS continues to increase their usage of automated programs to identify tax returns that they believe warrant further scrutiny. Here are ten typical red flags that could get the IRS’s attention.

Math Errors and Typos – The IRS has programs that check the math and calculations on tax returns. If your return ‘doesn’t add up,’ it may be flagged for further review. Double check your social security numbers – and your math.

High Income – Fewer than 1% of tax returns with $200,000 or less in income are audited. That percentage grows to 10% and higher for those earning above $1 million. Obviously, you don’t want to try to earn less money to avoid an audit! As you’d expect, the higher your income, the more likely you will get attention from the IRS.

Unreported Income – The IRS receives copies of your W-2s and 1099s and their systems automatically compare this data to the amounts you report on your tax return. A discrepancy, such as a 1099 that isn’t reported on your return, could trigger further review. So, if you receive a 1099 that isn’t yours, or isn’t correct, don’t ignore it. Contact the issuer of that 1099 and ask them to report a corrected form to the IRS.

Excessive Deductions – The IRS will compare your itemized deductions to the average total deductions for a given item claimed by other taxpayers who are in the same income range as you. A taxpayer whose deductions appear to exceed these averages may be further scrutinized by the IRS. Don’t hesitate to claim every deduction that you are entitled to – just make sure you have the proper documentation. For example, if you made a noncash charitable donation over $500, make sure you file Form 8283 and keep the acknowledgement of the donation received from the charity in your records.

Schedule C Filers – The IRS particularly watches for businesses that operate primarily with cash – and almost certainly those that are reporting a loss. They have lots of experience auditing self-employed taxpayers who underreport income or overstate expenses. Just make sure your records support what you are reporting.

Claiming 100% Business Use of a Vehicle – The IRS knows that it’s rare for someone to use a vehicle they own 100% of the time for business purposes. And, if you don’t have another personal vehicle registered in your name, it’s nearly impossible to report that the vehicle is exclusively used for business. Claiming 100% business use of a vehicle will almost certainly draw IRS attention. The higher percentage you are claiming, the more critical it is that you have detailed records.

Claiming a Loss on a Hobby – Writing off expenses for a business is fine – but you can’t portray your hobby as a business. For it to be a business, you must have a reasonable expectation to make a profit. In general, the IRS will expect you to report a profit for 3 of every 5 years you operate the business. If you report your hobby as a business, it must be run like a business, with appropriate records and documentation. Otherwise, the IRS could require you to restate any business income/loss as a hobby income/loss, subject to hobby rules. For more information, refer to the IRS’s rules on hobbies.

Home Office Deduction – To claim the Home Office Deduction, you must use a portion of your home “regularly and exclusively” for business. Keep in mind that the IRS doesn’t see the dining room table as a desk! And, having a TV in the ‘home office’ could raise exclusivity questions. Most importantly, home office deductions from a person earning wages may draw increased attention, so make sure home office expenses are well-documented and supported.

Deducting Business Meals, Travel and Entertainment – This is another area that draws IRS attention because of past abuse. First, it’s probably obvious that you can’t deduct expenses for which your employer reimburses you. Second, you must keep careful records – not just a receipt, but also a record of who was in attendance and the specific business purpose. The IRS doesn’t want you enjoying lavish meals and entertainment on Uncle Sam’s nickel.

Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) – The IRS estimates that 21% – 26% of EITC claims are paid in error – that’s $14 – $17 billion paid in error in 2013! Some errors are unintentional, but the IRS scrutinizes EITC claims closely to prevent fraud. If you claim the Earned Income Tax Credit, make sure to document how you meet EITC rules so that you can provide this documentation to the IRS in the future, if needed.

Don’t Cheat the Government – But Don’t Cheat Yourself Either

There’s no reason to overpay the government a single dollar! If you’re entitled to a deduction or credit, you should take every penny you deserve. Understanding the flags that can trigger an IRS audit is a good way to help you verify that your tax return deductions and claims are accurate and well-documented.

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Gene Salo

Gene Salo

Gene “Geno” Salo has worked in the tax industry across a variety of roles for over 20 years. His current position is Senior Director over Tax Simple, an online do-it-yourself tax preparation program designed to make filing your personal income taxes easy and convenient. Geno also serves on the Board of Directors for CERCA (Council for Electronic Revenue Communication Advancement) and is a member of the Free File Alliance, a partnership between the software industry and the IRS to provide free tax return preparation options to consumers. Geno has an MBA from the University of Michigan and is a veteran of the US Air Force. Geno contributes blog articles for Tax Simple customers, and also delivers specialized content direct to tax professionals and CPAs.
Gene Salo

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